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Celebrating Earth Day every day in my jewelry brand: A commitment to sustainability and ethics

Yesterday was Earth Day, but our planet's day is every day.


In a world where rapid, mass production seems to be the norm, I am proud to follow a different path in my jewelry brand. I understand that protecting our planet is a daily and constant task, and therefore, I want to share with you the commitment I have to sustainability and caring for the environment in every step of my production process.


Every piece I create is a manifestation of this commitment. From design to packaging, every decision is guided by my deep respect for our planet and its resources. Instead of contributing to the unsustainable production cycle, I strive to do my part to minimize my environmental impact and promote ethical practices in the jewelry industry.


One of the ways I do this is by using exclusively recycled materials and eco resins with 75% biological content. I opt for less toxic processes, such as using diluted alum instead of sulfuric acid to pickle silver. This choice not only guarantees my safety, it eliminates the production of toxic waste, thereby significantly reducing my carbon footprint and contributing to the conservation of natural resources. Additionally, I am committed to using local products and supplies, while supporting small businesses whenever possible. This benefits the local economy and contributes to the reduction of carbon emissions.


A group of large, geometric wooden beads are scattered on the jewelry table to make a series of necklaces.
Manufacturing process of necklaces in wooden scraps. © Dikua

However, my commitment goes beyond materials and processes. I also worry about the impact of my packaging. I use handmade containers made of natural fibers or recycled plastic made by the expert hands of indigenous Oaxacans, as well as recycled cardboard boxes. This not only supports local communities but also reduces waste and promotes the reuse of materials.


My production approach is small-scale, following the precepts of slow fashion and slow jewelry. Each piece is made slowly, ethically, and responsibly. I minimize the use of non-essential supplies, such as polishing waxes, baths, and metal sheets, which seem wasteful to me given their short useful life. I believe that the beauty and quality of my jewelry do not depend on the speed and massiveness of production, but on the care and attention I put into every detail.


My commitment to sustainability has grown over time, as I have become more aware of the lack of care that exists in jewelry production in my country. But I am not satisfied with simply lamenting this situation. Instead, I hope to do my part to influence the practice of entrepreneurship and sustainable production in the jewelry industry.


A pair of mismatched oval earrings handmade in recycled sterling silver rest in the palm of an open hand
Handmade Mismatched Oval Earrings in Recycled Sterling Silver © Dikua

I know that in Mexico it is practically impossible to get stones, gold, or silver certified for responsible mining, or even metal recycling certificates. But that doesn't stop me. I continue to look for alternatives and support small local suppliers that share my commitment to sustainability. I believe that together we can make a difference and contribute to a more sustainable future for all.


Lastly, if any jewelers read me, I would like to recommend the book "Eco Jewelry Handbook" by Christine Dhein. Although few of the supplies are available in Mexico, they will surely be helpful material for whoever can acquire them. I am convinced that sharing knowledge and resources is essential to moving toward a more sustainable and ethical world in the jewelry industry.

Thank you for being part of my community and for supporting my commitment to sustainability in jewelry. Together we can make a difference.


Happy Earth Day, yesterday, today, and always!


An eco jewelry book and a directory of sustainable products and services are placed on a wooden table
The book is current, unfortunately, The Green Pages ceased to exist in 2020, and this is the only physical copy I have, already quite old, although the Facebook account remains, and some information can be accessed there.


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